What are you reading?

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by Emma, Dec 31, 2009.

  1. Glenn

    Glenn Well-Known Member Contributor

    "A Princess of Mars" written by Edgar Rice Burroughs and soon to be in your neighborhood theater called "John Carter." I think the Martian series by ERB was on a par with his "Tarzan" series. This will be my third reading which is almost something I never do much less read any book twice.
  2. Warhawk

    Warhawk The cake is a lie. Staff Member Contributor

    OK, so I just finished reading "Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies" and while interesting in topic, it is slow reading at times and not as good as Collapse, in my opinion. But I would read GGS first if you are going to read both. The topics are interesting and answer questions you may not know you had to begin with.

    I also read "Up and Down California in 1860 -1864, the Journal of Wiliam H. Brewer". He helped lead the first geologic survey of California. I wasn't quite sure of what to expect with this one and think that I was hoping for more than I got. It was still neat to read about his travels and the conditions of many cities he visited at the time and the adventures he had. Not as much geology as you may think, but more about the travels and perils of such a journey across California in that time.

    I also tore through a couple novels by Boyd Morrison just for fun.

    I just started reading "Two Graves" by Lincoln and Child. Another Pendergast novel. Haven't gotten far into it yet, but a refreshing change of pace after GGS!
  3. VF21

    VF21 #KingsFansForever Staff Member Contributor

    I'm re-reading the Dragonriders of Pern series by Anne McCaffrey. I'd forgotten how enjoyable they are to get lost in for a few hours at a time.
  4. Prophetess

    Prophetess Gallifrayain

    those are some really good books. Wish I had the whole series. I have bits and pieces of them.

    I'm currently reading A Christmas Carol on ebook(almost done, next up is Les Miserables), Agatha Christies' Mrs.McGinty is Dead in paperback, any and all books that Ziah brings me(this is a wide variety of paperback and hardback books). His favorite lately are easy read Mickey books for prereaders, he's picking up words and I love it!
  5. Warhawk

    Warhawk The cake is a lie. Staff Member Contributor

    Just finished reading Earth Unaware by Orson Scott Card. It is the first in a series covering the First Formic War that precedes the events in Ender's Game. Takes a while to set up the story, but gets going partway through and is entertaining. Easily read - it is in a young adult style of writing. The sequels should be better without all the "required" backstory to start the new series.
  6. TyFreak Evans

    TyFreak Evans Active Member

    I will be honest. Never have been a huge fan of reading, and I probably never will. BUT, I have always been a huge fan of the possibility of writing, and I am in the early stages of planning a novel, or a series of novels.

    Stay tuned, my friends.
  7. The Hammer

    The Hammer Well-Known Member

    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 31, 2013
  8. spudfan

    spudfan Well-Known Member

    Born to Run is a great book for entertainment and motivation. As far as actually running advice and realistic information...
  9. The Hammer

    The Hammer Well-Known Member

    Completely agree. And, the "nutrition" advice is absolutely ****ing horrendous.

    He's a great writer, no doubt. But if I ever saw him in person I would dress him down vociferously for taking a subject with some solid science behind it, and completely butchering the presentation of that science, which makes him and the (still decent) science look totally retarded. How that **** got past his posse of proofreaders boggles my mind.

    I will refine your point a bit if I may. For running advice, I agree, but for running philosophy, it's pretty spot on. But you can't run on philosophy. What most people end up doing is getting psyched about barefoot/minimalist running after reading the book, and then going to youtube for Lee Saxby, Dr. Cucuzzella, or Dr. Lieberman videos (or other qualified coach) to get the basics.

    But really, it's pretty simple. Just take off the ****ing retarded foam cushion, and your pretty far along to changing your stride naturally. Use what minimal road/trail protection you need, just don't pad your heel, and don't have arch support... and transition SLOWLY. You can also do some very basic posture/balance drills. Lee Saxby has some great vids.

    I'm a full on barefoot/minimalist convert at this point, and it happened pretty damn quick after getting wind of this philosophy. It's a game changer for me.

    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 31, 2013
  10. Padrino

    Padrino Well-Known Member

    currently reading Strange Light by Derrick Brown. it's one of my favorite new collections of poetry. i'd offer that it can be read by anyone. anyone. so don't be afraid to approach the fullness of its pages. flash a middle finger to the apprehension that high school classrooms instill in young readers with respect to poetry, because too many individuals carry that anxiety so much farther than is necessary. you don't have to "get it," and i don't care what your reading habits are, there's never a bad time to give poetry a try...
  11. arwen undomiel

    arwen undomiel Active Member Contributor

    Finally done with the Wheel of Time. On to A Song of Fire and Ice.
  12. Turgenev

    Turgenev Active Member

    I am reading the invention of solitude by Auster. It is the first time I have read it and so far it is pretty damn good.
  13. VF21

    VF21 #KingsFansForever Staff Member Contributor

    I finally got a chance to read Ender's Game (having found it at a yard sale and remembering that it had been mentioned in some of our reading threads). I have to admit to being very pleasantly surprised. It was an easy yet very enjoyable read.
    Jespher likes this.
  14. Warhawk

    Warhawk The cake is a lie. Staff Member Contributor

    That was me! Glad you liked it. It is definitely a bit of a "young adult" book, but still enjoyable to adults as well. I loaned it to two folks at work and they liked it too. Definitely looking forward to the movie.
  15. HndsmCelt

    HndsmCelt Well-Known Member

    These days I am deep into old school detective novels. I am currently rereading the Travis McGee books by John D. McDonald. Got "The Green Ripper" out tonight
  16. kennadog

    kennadog Dog On It!

    Love McGee. Haven't read all of them. One of my most favorite old school PI's was Lew Archer by Ross MacDonald. I did read everyone of them. Just donated all of my old paperbacks a few months ago. Darn near brought me to tears, but minimizing my household is a necessity. ;)

    I'm a bit of a ghoulish reader and into detective/murder mystery.police procedural type books for "entertainment." (Yet, I look like such a sweet old lady, mwwwwahahahahaha.) Reading Joyce Carol Oates "Zombie." Truly a chilling novel written in first person by a serial killer. Just downright frightening.
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2013
  17. HndsmCelt

    HndsmCelt Well-Known Member

    I'll put it on my list. I am now reading Richard Stark AKA Donald Westlake. I into the 3rd Parker book "The Outfit." Serious old school hard boiled pulp fiction.
  18. Turgenev

    Turgenev Active Member

    I am reading sent for you yesterday by John Edgar wideman.
  19. Kingster

    Kingster Well-Known Member

    I love this topic. Am always searching for good reading material. I'm reading The Six Wives of Henry VIII (Weir), the Deptford Trilogy (Davies) , and Winterkill (CJ Box).
  20. Kingster

    Kingster Well-Known Member

    Sometimes I like reading frightening books also. I've never read one more frightening than The Exorcist. Even more intense than the movie. If they really made the movie like the book people would leave the theater. :) This is a good sub-topic: what is the most frightening novel you've ever read?
  21. VF21

    VF21 #KingsFansForever Staff Member Contributor

    The Shining.
  22. Kingster

    Kingster Well-Known Member

    I read it, and found some interesting ideas in it. But the analysis of China and their development was woeful imo. To not deal with ideology as a key factor in the fate of societies is limited in my view.
  23. Kingster

    Kingster Well-Known Member

    Never read that one. I'll put it on the list.
  24. Kingster

    Kingster Well-Known Member

    Great book that I read in high school. I live out in the country now, so I don't want to think about it....
  25. Prophetess

    Prophetess Gallifrayain

    Currently rereading The Phantom Tollbooth on my phone. One of my very favorite books. Incredibly easy read at this age but hey I don't have a lot of time and it brings back great memories. I hope to get to my very new to me actual books soon.
  26. HndsmCelt

    HndsmCelt Well-Known Member

    Well now you will have to read Dr. Sleep next then ;)(Although I put my copy #5 in my current Que)
  27. VF21

    VF21 #KingsFansForever Staff Member Contributor

    I have mixed feelings about reading it. For me, King's stuff had a much better edge to it before he literally faced death himself.
  28. kennadog

    kennadog Dog On It!

    I love the Phantom Tollbooth!

    Interestingly, as many of King's books as I've read, I've never read The Shining." Have to add it to my read soon list.

    Scariest book. I may have to think about that one. I've read so many books, I'm not sure. In Cold Blood is definitely one of them. Silence of the Lambs was pretty darn scary/creepy

    Also read The Last Stand of Fox Company not long ago. True story about one of the Marine Corps most extraordinary and celebrated battles. It occurred in Korea. Very intense and incredibly scary in a whole different way. Just unbelievable courage and fortitude. I've read several books about the Korean War recently to satisfy my desire to know more about a war that has been so glossed over in US history books, sandwiched between to glorious victory of WWII and the major controversy and upheaval of the Vietnam conflict. David Halberstam's book on the Korean War (or "police action") was very good, too.
  29. Warhawk

    Warhawk The cake is a lie. Staff Member Contributor

    I am finishing "The Last Dark" - the final book in the final Thomas Covenant series by Stephen R. Donaldson. Might even finish tonight. While at times I think he goes into a bit too much detail, I find the stories captivating and the characters engaging to read about. Check them out (in order!) if you are into fantasy at all. I was introduced to "Lord Foul's Bane" in maybe 1983 or so.

    The series are as follows (stolen from wiki for copy/paste):

    The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever
    1. Lord Foul's Bane – (1977)
    2. The Illearth War – (1978) ("Gilden-Fire" - first published 1981)[1]
    3. The Power that Preserves – (1979)
    The Second Chronicles of Thomas Covenant
    1. The Wounded Land – (1980)
    2. The One Tree – (1982)
    3. White Gold Wielder – (1983)
    The Last Chronicles of Thomas Covenant
    1. The Runes of the Earth – (2004)
    2. Fatal Revenant – (2007)
    3. Against All Things Ending – (2010)
    4. The Last Dark – (2013)
    Prophetess likes this.
  30. Padrino

    Padrino Well-Known Member

    finally getting around to working my way through david foster wallace's encyclopedic Infinite Jest. i absolutely loved the wit and depth of his short story collection, Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, and i've been wanting to dive into his most accomplished novel ever since...
    HndsmCelt likes this.

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